Humankind guide - the beginning of the game, world settings, all leaders and their bonuses

Humankind guide - the beginning of the game, world settings, all leaders and their bonuses

 

Learn more about the early stages of Humankind: choosing difficulty, setting the world, speed, leaders for enemy factions, conditions for achieving victory, and much more.


Before the launch of the Humankind campaign recommend that you devote as much time as possible to the settings that set the complexity of the future passage.


There can be up to 10 competitors on one map in Humankind (including you). AI-controlled opponents are based either on mythological creatures, characters from legendary epics, or on historical figures. The key factor to look out for is the AI ​​character you see when you click on your opponent's icon. There are various archetypes that determine the behavior of an AI, as well as its strengths and biases that provide certain bonuses.


Some leaders are not available at first. To unlock additional identities, try linking your account with Games2Gether. There you can share your avatar and the work done.


All AI leaders and their bonuses

  • Agamemnon . Cruelty (people are a renewable resource, and the only thing that matters is how they do their job). Militarism (military power is the best means of achieving goals). Wanderings (it is better to place outposts further from each other), pioneer (-10% to the cost of creating outposts), colonizer (-25% to the cost of creating outposts).
  • Valinon-Sari . Impulsiveness (words should be supported by deeds, whatever the cost), isolation (relations are best developed with only a few empires), pride (other people's demands should be rejected), perfectionist (-10% to the cost of science for researching technologies), foreman (-20 % to the cost of industry for cultural wonders).
  • Beowulf . Militarism (military power is the best means of achieving goals), passion (you need to use all your resources, even if it weakens the defense), attack (it is better to attack without warning), lumberjack (+ 50% of the industry when deforestation), marauder (+ 100% to the money for the plunder).
  • Elissa . Sociability (the desire to develop relations with other empires), xenophobia (differences are the cause of enmity, it is better not to communicate with strangers), navigation (it is important to develop the fleet and coastal cities), collector (-25% to the influence necessary to discover a cultural miracle), crusader (+2 to the combat power of the unit in territories influenced by other religions).
  • Semiramis . Conviction (the main thing is to adhere to the plan at any cost), vigilance (are your intentions so pure, trust must be won), stubbornness (for the first culture - until the very end), ideologist (+5 to the influence of the central square), artist (+2 to the influence of the public quarter).
  • Mommy Okklo . Caution (preference for a defensive style of play), isolation (it is best to develop relations with only a few empires), defense (the main thing is reliable defense of the borders), expansion (-25% to the cost of joining, -25% to the cost of uniting cities), defender (+4 to the combat power of military districts if there are units nearby).
  • Mu Guiying . Decency (justice and loyalty are above all, it is important to keep your word), rancor (you cannot forgive insults), originality (very peculiar ideological positions), skillfully (+ 50% to money from vassals), commander (+2 to the combat power of iconic detachments ).
  • Arjuna . Decency (justice and loyalty are above all, it is important to keep your word), rancor (you cannot forgive insults), vindictiveness (the enemy must be destroyed at any cost), usurer (+2 to the money of the trading quarter), enthusiast (+ 100% to the scientific resource) ...
  • Tjilbruck . Philanthropy (happiness and freedom of people above all else), pacifism (negotiations and trade are better than open confrontation), hippies (it would be nice to be friends with everyone), charm (+50 to the stability of the city), conservative (+5 to the stability of the forest).
  • Midas . Composure (measure seven times, cut once), generosity (let the mistakes of the past remain in the past, the future is much more important), wealth (accumulates precious resources and does not seek to control all manufactories), capitalist (+ 15% to money), large trader ( + 100% income from trade routes).
  • Gilgamesh . Treachery (this leader does not hesitate to break contracts), flexibility (if the plan can be changed if necessary, this is a good plan), perseverance (never give up, victory at any cost), warrior (+1 to the combat power of iconic units), rogue (+5 to the industrial resource of the craft quarter).
  • Makeda . Openness (it is important to learn from others and be open to everything new), gullibility (it is important to build strong relationships), globalization (you need to assimilate as many independent cities as possible), patron (+ 25% to the cost of patronage), rogue (+2 to combat power detachment if the army is rented).
  • Progenitor (Ancestor) . Excitement (you need to use all your resources, even if it weakens the defense), adaptive (changes tactics in accordance with the needs), scout (+1 to the movement points of all units), colonialist (-25% to the cost of creating an outpost), wandering (better place outposts further apart).
  • Boudicca . Militarism (military power is the best means of achieving goals), composure (measure seven times, cut once), commander (+2 to the combat power of iconic units), crusader (+2 to the combat power of a detachment in territories influenced by other religions), revenge (the enemy must be destroyed at any cost).
  • Edgar . Closure (it is best to develop relationships with only a few empires), caution (doubts your intentions, so you need to make more efforts to convince him), esthete (+1 to the influence of the public quarter), geek (+ 10% to scientific resource), adherent (maintains ideological positions similar to other empires).
  • Gilgamesh . Treachery (this leader does not hesitate to break contracts), adaptive (changes tactics according to needs), warrior (+1 to combat power for iconic units), + 5% to industry in the creator quarter, never gives up, since victory is the only acceptable Exodus.
  • Lucy . Impulsiveness (words must be backed up by deeds, whatever the cost), adaptive (changes tactics according to needs), patron (+ 25% to the cost of patronage for free peoples), master (+ 50% money from vassals), inclusiveness (wants assimilate as many free peoples as possible).
  • Victor . Philanthropy (people's happiness and freedom above all else), vindictiveness (the enemy must be destroyed at any cost), artist (+2 to the influence of the public quarter), collector (-25% to the influence necessary to discover a cultural miracle), hipster (prefers ideological positions which are least occupied by other empires).
As you can see, archetypes and biases can affect how the AI ​​interacts with you and the rest of the world. For example, those who prefer a more peaceful game will probably want to choose Tjilbruke as their opponent. Lucy and Makeda might be an alternative, but expect them to gain an edge over you by building relationships with Free Peoples (AI-controlled minor factions).

However, if you want to focus on the war, you can choose Beowulf and Boudicca. Agamemnon and the Ancestor can also be dangerous opponents, but at higher difficulty levels. They will start building outposts all over the place, and you may find yourself locked up or in the early stages faced with a huge empire with vast dominions. And, of course, pay attention to Gilgamesh. This isn't the same guy from Civilization 6 who wanted to be friends with everyone. This is the character who will happily betray you when you least expect it.

World settings

Then you can take a look at the "World Settings" column. Here you can choose the size of the map and other parameters, including the shape of the world / continents, the percentage of land and water, the abundance of rivers, ridges, rocks, and so on. You can also choose a "streamlined world" - a closed map that is a sphere. The size of the map determines the number of nodes with resources. There is currently no separate tweak to increase or decrease the amount of luxury and strategic resources. Thus, on smaller maps, you may find fewer strategic resources (such as aluminum, oil, or uranium) that are needed to buy certain units or projects. This will prevent you from achieving certain goals, especially if these less numerous nodes belong to another empire. However, you can exchange these nodes or destroy the enemy that occupies them.

Speed ​​settings

In the speed settings, you can choose the number of moves before the end of the game. This will determine which unit kits and tech research will be available. The end conditions for winning are also listed here. By default, the game lasts until one of the following conditions:


  • The game lasts no more than 300 moves at normal speed.
  • Get all the stars of the last era.
  • Research all technologies.
  • Destroy all other empires.
  • Vassalization of all other empires.
  • Sending a mission to Mars.
  • Make the Earth unfit for human life (pollute).

If you are playing in multiplayer mode, you will see additional options for timers (for example, completing a turn or participating in tactical battles).

Difficulty settings

Finally, in the difficulty settings, you can make the task easier or harder. For beginners, I would recommend staying at the City level to learn all the mechanics. Those with more experience in 4X strategies can try their hand at the "Nation" or "Empire" mode. You can also take a look at the Humanity difficulty, which is analogous to the Divine from Civilization. Finally, there is the "peaceful mode", which prevents the AI ​​leaders from declaring war on you or attacking you. However, once you do this, they will have to answer.

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